Hong Kong"s reversion to China and implications for U.S. policy
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Hong Kong"s reversion to China and implications for U.S. policy hearing before the Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs of the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, second session, April 2, 1992. by

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Published by U.S. G.P.O. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Democracy -- China -- Hong Kong.,
  • Hong Kong (China) -- Politics and government.,
  • United States -- Foreign relations -- China -- Hong Kong.,
  • Hong Kong (China) -- Foreign relations -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesS. hrg -- 102-772.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationiii, 50 p.
Number of Pages50
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17750344M

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Hong Kong's reversion to China and implications for U.S. policy: hearing before the Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs of the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, second session, April 2,   This article examines the implications of the political transition of Hong Kong on US‐China relations in strategic, political and economic dimensions. It evaluates the impact of Hong Kong's changing status in the context of the engagement‐containment debate on China policy in the US. It suggests that US concerns over questions such as democracy and human rights and China's Cited by: 3.   (Archived document, may contain errors) HONG KONG'S ROLE IN U.S.-CHINA POLICY by Martin L. Lasater On Decem , British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Chinese Premier Zhao Ziyang. Great Britain had acquired Hong Kong Island from China in , when the Treaty of Nanking was signed at the end of the first Opium War (). Unsatisfied with incomplete control of the harbour, the British forced China to cede Kowloon Peninsula south of what is now Boundary Street and Stonecutters Island less than 20 years later, after the second Opium War ().

  Rights under threat: how China is bringing Hong Kong to heel This article is more than 10 months old Beijing has chipped away at the city’s autonomy for 22 years – and protests reflect growing.   The report recommended an assessment of the export control policy on technology “as it relates to U.S. treatment of Hong Kong and China as separate customs areas.” 1 2. More information about Hong Kong is available on the China Country Page and from other Department of State publications and other sources listed at the end of this fact sheet. U.S.-HONG KONG RELATIONS. In , China resumed the exercise of sovereignty over Hong Kong, ending more than years of British colonial rule.   The U.S. Congress should enact legislation that would suspend the special economic status Hong Kong enjoys under U.S. law should China deploy forces to crush protests in the territory, a congressional advisory body said on Thursday. The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC), whichAuthor: By David Brunnstrom.

In recent years, Hong Kong has not been much of a direct benefit or a drain on Britain. None of Hong Kong's taxes or enormous foreign reserves are remitted to Britain (nor will they go to China).Author: Todd Crowell.   The Hong Kong Monetary Authority has spent billions in just the last year protecting the Hong Kong dollar’s long-standing peg to the U.S. dollar and the basis of the city’s financial : Milton Ezrati.   China agreed to govern Hong Kong under the principle of "one country, two systems", where the city would enjoy "a high degree of autonomy, except in .   Editor's Note: This policy brief is an adapted chapter from Richard C. Bush's upcoming book, "Hong Kong in the Shadow of China: Living with the Leviathan" (Brookings .