Roger Fenton, photographer of the Crimean War
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Roger Fenton, photographer of the Crimean War his photographs and his letters from the Crimea. by Roger Fenton

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Published by Arno Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Crimean War, 1853-1856 -- Pictorial works.,
  • Photography, Artistic.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Reprint of the 1954 ed.

StatementWith an essay on his life and work by Helmut and Alison Gernsheim.
SeriesThe Literature of photography
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDK214 .F45 1973
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 106 p.
Number of Pages106
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5289439M
ISBN 100405049099
LC Control Number72009200

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  In , Roger Fenton (–69) traveled to the war-torn Crimea to capture scenes of the conflict and the soldiers involved. A pioneering photographer who helped establish photography as an art form, Fenton was also one of the first to document the brutality of war through this then-fledgling by: 1. As a long-standing Crimean War buff I've been waiting for this book with eager anticipation and I'm glad to report that it's excellent. Drawing on the Royal Collection's holdings of Roger Fenton's Crimean photographs (the world's largest), and accompanying an exhibition at Holyrood Palace, it's a comprehensive record of Fenton's trip to the /5(9).   Three hundred and fifty of his images are now collected in “Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, ” by Sophie Gordon with contributions by Louise Pearson. The volume offers a more comprehensive view of his work beyond the dozen or so images familiar to the public. Red Cloth. Condition: Very Good. Dust Jacket Condition: Good. 1st Edition. ROGER FENTON, photographer of the Crimean War. His Photographs and his Letters from The Crimea, With an Essay of his Life and Work by Helmut and Alison Gernsheim, London, .

Roger Fenton's Crimean War photographs represent one of the earliest systematic attempts to document a war through the medium of photography. He was commissioned by the publisher Thomas Agnew at the insistence of Prince Albert. In , Roger Fenton (–69) traveled to the war-torn Crimea to capture scenes of the conflict and the soldiers involved. A pioneering photographer who helped establish photography as an art form, Fenton was also one of the first to document the brutality of war through this then-fledgling medium. Today, many of his images, like The Valley of the Shadow of Death, .   Roger Fenton, the man who would make history as the photographer of the Crimean War, was raised in great comfort in England. He was born in Rochdale, Lancashire, on Ma ; his father was a Member of Parliament and a banker, and his grandfather was a cotton industrialist and also a banker. The Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace gives a welcome airing to the powerful Crimean War photographs of Roger Fenton. One of Roger Fenton’s most famous photographs – an eerily empty valley in the Crimea strewn with cannonballs – brilliantly captured the aftermath of the charge of the heavy brigade at Balaclava and the brutality of the Crimean War.

Roger Fenton Photographer of the Crimean War (Literature in Photography Series) by Roger Fenton and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at . Roger Fenton, English photographer best known for his pictures of the Crimean War, which were the first extensive photographic documents of a war. Fenton studied painting and then law. Following a trip in to Paris, where he probably visited with the photographer Gustave Le Gray, he returned to. About the Roger Fenton Crimean War Photographs Collection. Roger Fenton's Crimean War photographs represent one of the earliest systematic attempts to document a war through the medium of photography. Fenton, who spent fewer than four months in the Crimea (March 8 to J ), produced photographs under extremely trying conditions.   As TIME wrote, describing the works of noted Crimean War photographers like Roger Fenton, James Robertson, Felice Beato, and Carol Szathmari: "Their pictures might lack the often-brutal drama of modern war photography, but they nevertheless serve as compelling documentation of the look and, in a sense, the logistics of midth-century warfare.".